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New monitor from Viewsonic prepares your old PC for the new Windows

By Staff writers | 11:04 am 14/11/2012

One of the things that Windows 8 brings is compatibility: it likes old school computers. Whether you have Windows XP, Vista, or 7, you can upgrade. But if you don’t have a touchscreen, you probably won’t enjoy your Windows 8 experience as much, and that’s where Viewsonic is coming in.

Heading to stores later this year, Viewsonic’s TD2220 can play the part of the upgrade for Windows 8 machines, bringing touch interactivity to a monitor for under $400.

The screen brings a 20,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio to a 22 inch screen (only 21.5 inch is viewable) with 1920×1080 resolution.

Touch is obviously the reason someone would consider this monitor, and Viewsonic’s technology on this screen only allows two points of touch, going with optical tracking technology, a different choice from the capacity surfaces with ten point touch we’re used to seeing in touch screens.

We're guessing this picture only shows two fingers is because the screen only supports two points of simultaneous touch.

It won’t be everyone’s favourite, but it will bring touch connectivity to a desktop system where mouse control is still the dominant force, and that should allow people to use the Windows 8 touch-based tile menu, as well as other gestures with a maximum of two fingers on the screen.

The screen also features a hardened scratch-resistant surface, and works with either VGA or DVI connections, while delivering the touch-support over USB.

The ports on the Viewsonic TD2220 include two USB hub ports, a USB connection that goes back to your computer, the typical monitor power jug plug, and either a VGA or DVI port to plug your video feed into. No HDMI here.

Viewsonic’s TD2220 will hit stores in mid-December for $399 RRP.

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