Bang & Olufsen creates low-life with pretty subwoofer

Available in a few weeks for an as yet undisclosed sum, the BeoLab 11 eschews the squat-box design of most subwoofers for a tulip shape. Made from aluminium, a material with which the company has recognised expertise, the sub also sports the characteristic luxe finish of the Danish stylemeisters.

So it’s very pretty, meaning that – unlike conventional subwoofers which are recommended for positioning out of sight in a cupboard or under a couch – it is made to be seen. The BeoLab 11, then, should be located with pride in the entertainment room; either on the floor alongside your other speakers, or wall-mounted. And because bass is omnidirectional, the BeoLab – just like it’s less attractive kin – can be tucked away, without sound output being affected.

The BeoLab 11
The BeoLab 11

Because any subwoofer has to move a lot of air to create deep bass, they typically have a big drivers (or drivers) and a power amplifier. Combined, the energy created often causes a lot of vibration. In acoustic terms, vibration is distortion, and distortion is bad. ‘Bad’ because it means the sound you hear is not an accurate reproduction of the original recording.

Subwoofers that vibrate a lot not only inaccurate, but can produce so much physical energy that they will literally walk across the floor.

B&O tells us the BeoLab 11 doesn’t vibrate much, and after our session with it we have to agree. The BeoLab 11 cancels out most vibrations by using two 6.5 inch drivers positioned facing opposite each other within the enclosure with a 200 watt Class D ICEpower amplifier. If this vibration-less perfection is what you’re seeking, B&O sell a Anodised cover model for $2800 and a painted cover model for $2500.

One of the more impressive televisions we’ve seen of late is the BeoVision 7-55, a full HD 55 inch LCD with 1012 LEDs backlighting the entire set directly.

Making the TV more like a piece of art, the BeoVision 7-55 is sure to stun.
Making the TV more like a piece of art, the BeoVision 7-55 is sure to stun.

Increased depth and colour is achieved, according to Bang & Olufsen, by using the company’s “scanning backlight” technology. This turns the backlighting off each time the picture is refreshed, or 1/100th second.

You can check out the press release on the following pages for all the juicy titbits, but the package – which includes a soundbar with two 750 watt speakers, a built-in Blu-ray player, and a motorised stand – will set your wallet back just under $34,000.

The last thing B&O showed us was the most inexpensive it has ever marketed: an iPhone app.

While it won’t replace your full fledged Bang & Olufsen remote, the iPhone app “BeoLink” is designed to be a handy solution for controlling Bang & Olufsen equipment over a wireless connection. The software lets you control various TVs and stereo systems located in remote rooms of your home, as well as setup multiple devices to work together in harmony.

You can use the B&O iPhone app "BeoLink" for various B&O devices.

B&O’s iPhone app is free and available on the Apple AppStore, with plans to make it available for other smartphones by the end of the year.