The US Court of Appeal has dismissed the Kaspersky challenge to the constitutionality of the DHS Directive.

It upheld the provisions in the FY18 National Defence Authorization Act. This bans the use of Kaspersky products and services by US federal agencies and government contractors.

Eugene Kaspersky commented

The DC Circuit Court’s decision is disappointing. But the events of the past year that culminated in this decision were almost expected. Not just by our company, but by the cybersecurity industry in general. We’re sure that the issues involved in our litigation go far beyond technical aspects of US constitutional law. They include real-world problems concerning everyone. it is a progression of protectionism and balkanization in a world of understated cyber rivalry and highly sophisticated international cyber threats.

While that is a mouthful Eugene, you can’t fight the U.S. Constitution but 10-points for trying.

Kaspersky is leading a global push for transparency.

That includes opening a Global Transparency Initiative in a neutral country, Switzerland (GadgetGuy report and commentary here) and as he said

Industry’s leaders and stakeholders need to work together to develop a global cybersecurity risk management and mitigation strategy. It must  apply to all IT security vendors, regardless of their country of origin. With risk-informed regulation and evidence-based results, we can all promote security, increase transparency, and base decisions on reality, not geopolitical hypotheticals.