Using the wireless communication, we were able to take photos on the TZ40, send them in a smaller size to our phone, and share them on a social network immediately after, with images transferring in the space of a minute, at roughly 10 per 60 seconds.

Overall, the wireless transfer system works well, removing the need for a WiFi SD card, even if our pre-production camera and brand new smartphone didn’t like each other much in the NFC connection process.

Then there was the tough camera, which is designed to not only survive a heavy handed touch, but things your kids and the water can throw at it.

Wireless transfer on the Lumix FT5, sending the photos to the LG Optimus G.

The latest in a long line of rugged cameras from the company, the Lumix FT5 sports a new design that can take up to 100kg of pressure in water, proofing underwater for 13 metres, shockproof to two metres, and freeze-proof down to -10 Celsius.

This model features a smaller zoom, with only 4.6x available to you, though it will survive when you drown it, something the TZ40 cannot lay claim to.

We spent some time throwing it around and found that while the zoom can be a touch limiting, even in pre-production, this camera was no slouch, firing off the shots at a maximum of five frames per second with autofocus, and giving us some quick results when locking onto a dolphin swimming alongside our boat.

Awww... baby dolphin (100% crop)

Up close, the images aren’t super-sharp, but this could be a pre-production glitch, and we can easily make out what we’re looking at.

These two cameras weren’t the only models introduced, and Panasonic will be bringing out three other Lumix models without NFC including the FT25 tough camera, the WiFi capable SZ9, and the ultra-thin XS1 which packs 16 megapixel and 5x optical zoom into a truly slim body.

The super slim XS1. We wonder if the "XS" means "extra slim"...

Panasonic’s range of 2013 Lumix cameras will be hitting retail in May.

Leigh D. Stark travelled to Glenelg, South Australia as a guest of Panasonic Australia