Let’s say you want the opposite, and depth is important to you but shutter speed isn’t. In that situation, you can set the shutter speed to A on the top dial and control the aperture on the edge of the lens manually yourself.

And if you don’t want any control of either, that’s totally fine too, as you can set both to A and let the camera do its thing, which it does surprisingly well, running through either an automatic ISO selection, which can get pretty useful even in low light, which offers as high a low-light sensitivity as the rocking 50,000, which isn’t going to look fantastic in colour, but will be pretty handy if you’ve found the monochrome mode.

Monochromatic image straight from the Leica Q

Monochromatic image straight from the Leica Q

Yes, it wouldn’t be a Leica if it didn’t support black and white photography, and while this isn’t like the M Monochrom — a camera from Leica that can only shoot black and white (don’t laugh, we’d use that) — it does have an excellent monochrome mode hidden in the options for colour saturation, with it being the first option.

This isn’t a simple greyscale either, with a good solid black and white recreation of the image that can be captured in either JPG or RAW on the Leica Q’s 24 megapixel full-frame sensor.

Monochromatic image straight from the Leica Q (100 percent crop)

Monochromatic image straight from the Leica Q (100 percent crop)

In black and white, the blacks were deep with plenty of clarity and a lovely tonality running from the white to the blacks, though it’s not a black and white mode you can define like you can on other cameras, with no option for colour filtration control, so no extra bright skin tones from a red filter nor can you get heavier contrast from a blue or green filtration.

This is black and white, simple as it is, with no extra control until you bring the image into an imaging processing application.

Monochromatic image straight from the Leica Q

Monochromatic image straight from the Leica Q

Adobe’s Lightroom is included with the purchase, handy if you don’t already own a copy of aren’t a Photoshop user, which is supported too, because the RAW format of choice is Adobe’s Digital Negative, otherwise known as DNG.

When you take the black and white RAW into either of these apps, it’ll switch back to colour, but have no fear because you’ll have a black and white JPEG saved alongside it, which is handy too.

Image from the Leica Q

Image from the Leica Q

Colour is the other great part of this camera, with vibrant colours that feel closer to life and more accurate in white balance recreation than we see from most of the cameras that pass by our way.

This journalist and photographer isn’t much of a colour image person by default, but the Leica Q could change that, with a lovely sense to the images that feels like life has been captured, and won’t require all that much polishing to make it look better out of the camera.

Image from the Leica Q (100 percent crop)

Image from the Leica Q (100 percent crop)