Design

Sheryl Crow once sang that “a change would do you good”, and in the case of LG’s smartphone range, that is definitely true.

For three years, we’ve seen the company try to push out its idea of rear buttons being the best way of using a phone, with the back gradually adopting a curve most companies have shied away from.

And this year, the rear buttons are mostly gone and the curve is completely gone. If you had ever seen an LG phone before this model, before the G5, you’d think the previous designers had all been fired because this is completely different.

This is simple. This is elegant. This is understated, and that’s a good thing.

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The LG G5 pushes back from that suggestion that a phone is all about fashionably premium materials like leather by actually using the premium materials people have wanted for ages: metal and glass.

This phone is encased completely in metal, with the exception of that 5.3 inch screen on the front, which has your typical coating of Corning’s scratch-resistant Gorilla Glass 4.

Try not to drop it, because “scratch-resistant” doesn’t equate to “drop-proof”, but it should survive an encounter with your keys.

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That screen isn’t totally straight, though, with the top featuring a gentle curve as it flows up, almost to the point where you could think you’re using a curved screen, though it’s not quite as pronounced as what we see on Samsung’s “Edge” phones.

In fact, the curve here really does nothing, serving to look pretty even though it’s barely noticeable, providing just a bit of something extra.

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The edges, however, are a little unusual, and that’s because as smooth as they are, LG has leg a metal trim in place that has an edge you can feel, making the handholding a little strange.

You’ll definitely know when you’re picking this phone up, even though the metal can make things a little slippery.

Still, it’s not a bad device to hold.