Ohki's $650 42 inch passive 3D TV reviewed
3.9Overall Score
Price (RRP): $649 Manufacturer: Ohki

The price of 3D televisions has crashed since their introduction 18 months ago, with name brands now selling 42 inch active models for a smidge under $1000. The sting in the tail is that four pairs of 3D glasses for the family will add around $500, but with Ohki’s passive 3D set you get the whole deal delivered to your door for a smidge under $650.

Worth a look?  We thought so.

Features and specs

Korean electronics giant LG was the first to market with a passive 3D TV in mid-2011, and as the only maker of such panels in the world, its technology is the bedrock for the Ohki model under review here (Toshiba is also using LG’s passive 3D technology).

Ohki is the house brand of e-tailer, Ohki, and is available exclusively through its online store, which also sells cameras, GPS, appliances and other electronics equipment from mainstream brands.

In the box, you’ll find the LCD TV, a stand that needs to be assembled, HDMI cable, remote, a manual and four sets of passive 3D glasses. These are the same type you receive with your 3D cinema ticket, and are readily available elsewhere for around $10 each.

Four sets of these glasses are thrown in the box.

Ohki’s 42-inch (OHK42/LCD3D) supports 1080p Full HD, although only in 2D. Like all passive 3D sets currently available, the polarising technology used to alternate images to the left and right eyes effectively halves the resolution of the image, presenting a lower definition picture.

There’s plenty of connectivity options on the Ohki, with three HDMI sockets, one VGA, two component and two sets of composite RCA ports. You’ll also find two USB ports here, designed for both loading external content or recording programs to external USB drive using the set’s PVR feature.

The set provides a pair of 5 watt speakers.

Performance

The generic nature of the entry-level TV ‘animal’ is apparent in this Ohki 3D TV: it’s cosmetically unremarkable, the remote is standard, though nicely responsive, and the menu system is familiar, if a bit workman-like.

The picture, however, is what we’re here for, so what of just what kind of a 3D picture does $650 buy?

The answer is a surprisingly decent one, provided you’re prepared to muck about with the settings depending on the source material.

For example, the 3D Blu-ray versions of “Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs” and “The Lion King” delivered nicely convincing 3D effects out of our PS3 with the Ohki 3D set to “Antitone” mode. “Monster House”, however, displayed little 3D in this mode, but switching the regular “Positive Order” setting added the depth that was missing.

There was nothing we could identify about the source material that indicated which setting would suit best, so we recommend you try all options when loading your movie or game.