That’s a little more than our international S6 had, but much less than we’re used to seeing, and even Samsung’s Group Play, S-Voice assistant, and S Translator translation app are missing, practically confirming that these extra features few used are gone for good, and not taking up space on your phone.

We’re also fans of some of the features included on this model, such as high definition audio support being present, the fingerprint scanner which is much better to use than previous versions, and the double press of the home button to activate the camera, because oh man, what a lovely camera.

The fingerprint scanner is so much better in 2015 than it was on any of Samsung's 2014 phones.

The fingerprint scanner is so much better in 2015 than it was on any of Samsung’s 2014 phones.

Every year, the flagship phones find a way to outdo themselves in terms of upgrading camera quality, and compact cameras are now on high alert for being replaced by anyone and everyone carrying a decent smartphone.

Last year, our favourite smartphone camera was Sony’s Xperia Z3, which didn’t only provide stellar quality, but also had a camera button to let us go into camera mode quickly and easily from any screen, even off.

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This year, Samsung has learned a few things, and has made a double tap of the home button do the exact same thing, which is an excellent and easy way to launch the camera, which is also excellent for many reasons.

For starters, the camera has some impressive sensor technology applied to it, and the engineering team at Samsung has really outdone themselves here.

Image sample from the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge.

Image sample from the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge.

Overall, it’s a relatively sharp shooter, with great exposure in daylight and solid results when the lights go low and you don’t want to use the flash, either.

You can, mind you, and one is included, but we prefer it flash-less, native light and all, and Samsung’s Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge performs very well under these circumstances, and certainly better than most of the phones we’ve tested.

Image sample from the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge.

Image sample from the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge.

Likewise, macro photographers will enjoy a phone that actually allows you to get up close to things, with a shorter focus distance and the ability to pick up on small details. This is one camera we’d be happy to switch to.

Mobile performance is also quite good, hardly surprising since, again, this is the same technology that made the Galaxy S6 tick, meaning you can connect to 4G networks using Category 6 network tech, while use at home supports pretty much every networking spectrum used by consumers, ranging from the original 802.11b to the 802.11n we’re all mostly using, and even the 802.11ac that is the latest and greatest.

4G networks will get more performance, and depending on where you are in Australia and what telco you’re using, you could see speeds as high as the Cat6 limit of 300Mbps down. In Sydney on Telstra’s CBD, we didn’t see quite that, topping out at 67Mbps in our tests, which was perfectly fine for us.