Fancy a game of tennis? If you’re always trying to work on your top spin and the coach doesn’t live with you, a new sensor from Sony could just do the trick.

Sports-fans and budding athletes, listen up, because Sony has a product that might be worth paying attention to if tennis is the game that brings a huge grin to your face.

It’s called the Sony Smart Tennis Sensor, and if the name doesn’t say enough for you, it’s essentially a small bit of plastic that you attach to the bottom of a racket that brings a few sensors and tracking mechanisms to your tennis game to help you improve.

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According to Sony’s David King, it’s one of Sony’s new implementations of sports entertainment technology, which he says uses “technology to connect with sports of lifestyle activities to enhance experiences.”

“This is a real benefit to the end user, to the tennis player,” King told GadgetGuy this week. “We really do believe this is a game changer.”

That’s likely a literal statement, not just figurative, simply because this gadget has the potential to change your game if you’re already investing money in coaches, lessons, and so on and so on.

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And it will do so with sound waves.

Yes, this is one of those unique little gadgets that makes its mark by taking advantage of sound waves, with Sony’s audio engineers coming up with the goods to make the Smart Tennis Sensor work.

Essentially, by using a combination of audio tracking and an accelerometer, the sensor can work out where on the racket the ball hit, recording the strike zone, ball spin, and speed of both the ball and the swing.

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The sensor can do that by itself when used with or without a smartphone, plugging into a compatible tennis racket and tracking, but if you have either an Android or iOS smartphone, you can track the information.

In fact, if you set up the phone on a tripod or have someone hold the phone, you can also capture your movement using video, bringing in a slow motion element and stopping your tennis moves down to a tenth of a second to work out just how you’re swinging and hitting.

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