These start with the “Node,” which is a small streaming music player that doesn’t have any amplification, but will bring wireless connectivity to your current stereo system.

It will be joined by the “Powernode,” a similar product paired with a stereo amplifier capable of recording at 35-bit, which we’re told “eliminates any noise or distortion from the music” and provides 90 watts of power.

Another product lacks speakers, and this is the “Vault,” which is basically a NAS for people who don’t want to fuss around with network storage.

This product will have been 1 and 2TB inside, and will come with a CD ripper, able to make a copy of your music in both MP3 and FLAC, spitting out the disc and letting it do all the work for you that you’d normally need a computer for, before sending this to other Bluesound products in your home.

Then there’s the “Pulse,” and this looks to be the first all-in-one streaming sound product for Bluesound, with a specifically tuned speaker designed by Paul Barton, with one 5.25 inch subwoofer inside and two 2.75 inch aluminium cone drivers inside, providing 80 watts of power and controlled by three digital amps.

Finally, there’s the “Duo,” which is a small satellite speaker and subwoofer combination providing as much as 280 watts of power through an 8 inch subwoofer, and speakers with 4 inch woofers and 1 inch tweeters.

All of these devices connect to your network using the existing 802.11n technology, with Bluesound telling GadgetGuy there was no mesh network in place, and that this would utilise your existing setup, but that better networks with more access points and repeaters around the home would likely increase performance.

There’s also Bluetooth streaming included, making it possible to send music directly from a device, but no support for either AptX or AirPlay, with the wireless streaming handled through the Bluesound system and app, which will exist on Android and iOS.

Testing them briefly, the audio from the Duo speakers connected to a PowerNode was clear, very clear, with the feeling that we were listening to much bigger speakers than what was in the room. There was no extra fuzz or noise coming in despite the volume being offered, and all we could hear was the instruments and vocals being tested through the sound system, which reminded us larger speakers than the tiny things placed around the room.